DOIS POEMAS

Selected translations

Selected translations
Reggis Tongue
899 pages. Noioso. $29.95.

The sudden appearance of Reggis Tongue must qualify as one of the biggest literary stories of 2005. (Generally, one should never use the word “sudden,” because, frankly, nothing is ever sudden. Suddenly they divorced, the world will suddenly end! No, son, it’s been ending for a while.) With 12 volumes of translations published in frantic succession, Reggis Tongue suddenly staked his claim as the greatest translator, perhaps, of our time. Granted, there is nothing sexy about translating poems. When triumphant, one becomes merely invisible, but with the smallest blip, lapse or blunder, then abrupt universal ridicule, infamy, then gradual oblivion. For those who’ve been dozing for the last 12 moons, let me adumbrate essentially the aforementioned volumes, in order of publication:

1. The complete Guillaume Apollinaire, translated by Reggis Tongue (Stochastic Shack 2005).

2. The complete Antonin Artaud, translated by Reggis Tongue (Fawcett, Strauss & Giroux 2005).

3. The complete Cesar Vallejo, translated by Reggis Tongue (Xenograft Editions 2005).

4. The complete Vicente Huidobro, translated by Reggis Tongue (Blue Decimal 2005).

5. The complete Ingeborg Bachmann, translated by Reggis Tongue (University of Baja California Press 2005).

6. The complete Paul Celan, translated by Reggis Tongue (Community College of Northern Virginia Press 2005).

7. The complete Amelia Rosselli, translated by Reggis Tongue (Hash House Press 2005).

8. The complete Wislawa Szymborska, translated by Reggis Tongue (Vantage 2005).

9. The complete Miroslav Holub, translated by Reggis Tongue (Vallecula Press 2005)

10. The complete Attila Josef, translated by Reggis Tongue (Colon Press 2005).

11. The complete Nina Cassian, translated by Reggis Tongue (Semi-Colon Press).

12. The complete Nazim Hikmet, translated by Reggis Tongue (Cecum Press 2005).

Correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s 12 major poets, some of them quite difficult, if not impossible, converted from 9 mutually-hostile languages. No single mind should contain so much incongruity. Clayton Eshleman, Pierre Joris, Michael Hamburger, Eliot Weinberger and the rest of them should feel nothing but shame and disappear promptly from the face of this earth! But it’s not just volume, girth and length that distinguishes Reggis Tongue, it’s his modus operandi. In the preface to his just-released Selected translations, Tongue stated unabashedly: “Slovenly translators – bums, basically – think they have to choose between music and sense. To pin down meanings, many of them squash the tune. To ape the melody, they ditch or deface the semaphores. They don’t realize that syntax is melody. A translator must ignore the indigenous drumming echoing in his lumpy head and obey the alien word-order, rhythm of what’s he’s translating. Make it strange – never try to domesticate a foreign poem! As for meanings, what’s keeping a translator, experienced or novice, from buying an electronic dictionary?”. Sounds good, sort of, but how does it work in practice? Let’s look at Tongue’s rendition of Apollinaire’s “Le pont Mirabeau,” a much-beloved poem that’s been assassinated repeatedly over the years by everyone from Richard Wilbur to Donald Revell, to the Pogues. Here are the first six lines of the original:

Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine

Et nos amours

Faut-il qu’il m’en souvienne

La joie venait toujours après la peine

Vienne la nuit sonne l’heure

Les jours s’en vont je demeure

Wilbur attempts to duplicate the rhyming of “Seine”, “souvienne” and “peine”, with this lurching monstrosity:

Under the Mirabeau Bridge there flows the Seine

Must I recall

Our loves recall how then

After each sorrow joy came back again

Let night come on bells end the day

The days go by me still I stay

Recall, recall, what the hell is “come on bells”? Are we in a Dixie diner?! Compared to Wilbur, however, Revell is even more freeflowing. Like any teenager, he confuses love with lover. The more chicks, the more deep and cheap feelings. Haight-Ashury, anyone? And water doesn’t flow here but slips:

Under Mirabeau Bridge the river slips away

And lovers

Must I be reminded

Joy came always after pain

The night is a clock chiming

The days go by not I

Revell should have written “the river slid into first base,” to make it more American. As for the Pogues, God bless them, I will not discuss their sing-along version. Enough jive already, let’s go to the real jazz. Here, finally, is Reggis Tongue’s extraordinary rendition:

Under the bridge Mirabeau runs the Seine

And our loves

It is necessary that it remembers me

The joy always came after the sorrow

Vienna the night sounds the hour

The days from go away I remain

The first thing one notices is that, unlike Wilbur, Revell and every other English translator, Meredith, Hartley, Padgett, etc, Tongue does not anglicize “le pont Mirabeau” into “Mirabeau bridge”. By not flip-flopping the French word-order, he maintains the ambiguity of “Mirabeau”, which is both bridge and woman, woman as bridge, a haunting, beautiful image and the person the narrator’s talking to. The “our loves” in the next line become her loves also – that’s why Apollinaire writes “nos amours” and not “mes amours”. Since Mirabeau denotes “Beautiful Reflection”, the narrator’s also talking to himself, a potential suicide seeing his face in a roiling river slip sliding away. But he does not jump, fortunately, because a mysterious “it” – God? Love? Lovers? Mirabeau, mon amour? – is reminding him that “joy always came after sorrow”. The past-tense “came” maintains a tragic, suspenseful doubt, because we don’t know, never will, if joy will ever come again. With the next two lines, Tongue unleashes on us the full genius of his translation prowess. He does not mechanically convert “Vienne la nuit” into “Comes the night” but, noticing the capitalized “Vienne”, understands that Apollinaire is punning “vienne” with “Vienne”, the capitalized capital of the Austrian-Hungarian empire. With this subtle and masterful stroke, the poet evokes Mozart’s Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, composed in Vienna in 1787. A little night music remembered, and hoped for, a bit of nookies, the joy that always came after the sorrow. Another striking musical allusion enlivens the next line. The first modern man, Apollinaire exults in pop culture: “The days from go away I remain” is a barely-concealed paraphrase of Paul Simon’s “You know the nearer your destination, the more you slip sliding away”. So rivers do slip away, after all. My apologies, then, to Monsieur Donald Revell.

 

Traduções seletas
Reggis Tongue
Noioso, 899 p., $29,95.

O aparecimento repentino de Reggis Tongue só pode ser a maior sensação literária de 2005. (De modo geral, nunca se deve empregar o termo “repentino”, porque, francamente, nada é repentino. Eles se divorciaram repentinamente, o mundo vai acabar de repente! Não, meu filho, já está acabando há algum tempo.) Com a publicação frenética de 12 volumes de tradução, e em seqüência, Reggis Tongue de repente fez jus a sua pretensão de ser o maior tradutor de nossa época. Admito, não há nada de sexy na tradução de poemas. Quando triunfa, o tradutor torna-se simplesmente invisível, mas, ao menor deslize, lapso ou disparate: o escárnio universal e inesperado, a infâmia, e depois o esquecimento gradativo. Para aqueles que andaram cochilando nas últimas 12 luas, permitam-me esboçar a essência dos volumes mencionados, em ordem de publicação:

1. Poesia completa de Guillaume Apollinaire, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Velha Fronteira, 2005).

2. Poesia completa de Antonin Artaud, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Coelho & Hiena, 2005).

3. Poesia completa de César Vallejo, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Retaguarda Editorial, 2005).

4. Poesia completa de Vicente Huidobro, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Ateliê Alquiler, 2005).

5. Poesia completa de Ingeborg Bachmann, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Subjetiva, 2005).

6. Poesia completa de Paul Celan, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Nestrov, 2005).

7. Poesia completa de Amelia Rosselli, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Edibronze, 2005).

8. Poesia completa de Wislawa Szymborska, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Casa das Autorrosas, 2005).

9. Poesia completa de Miroslav Holub, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Obscuridades, 2005)

10. Poesia completa de Attila Josef, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Zero Letra, 2005).

11. Poesia completa de Nina Cassian, tradução de Reggis Tongue (13 Letras, 2005).

12. Poesia completa de Nazim Hikmet, tradução de Reggis Tongue (Cia. das Tretas, 2005).

Corrijam-me se eu estiver enganado, mas trata-se de 12 poetas de peso, alguns dos quais bastante difíceis, se não impossíveis, traduzidos a partir de 9 idiomas mutuamente hostis. É muita incongruência para uma mente só. Clayton Eshleman, Pierre Joris, Michael Hamburger, Eliot Weinberger e o resto do bando deveriam ter vergonha e desaparecer imediatamente da face da terra! Contudo, Reggis Tongue não se distingue apenas pelo volume, a abrangência e a extensão de sua obra, mas também por seu modus operandi. No prefácio das recém-publicadas Traduções seletas, Tongue declara despudoradamente: “Os tradutores desmazelados – vagabundos, na verdade – acham que devem escolher entre a musicalidade e o sentido. A fim de apreender o significado, muitos deles reprimem a música. Para arremedar a melodia, descartam ou desfiguram as semáforas. Não percebem que a sintaxe é a melodia. O tradutor precisa ignorar a batida do idioma materno, que fica ecoando em sua cabeça dura, e obedecer à ordem alienígena das palavras, ao ritmo daquilo que ele traduz. Tem de parecer estranho – nunca tente domesticar um poema estrangeiro! Quanto ao significado, o que impede o tradutor, seja experiente ou iniciante, de comprar um dicionário eletrônico?”. Interessante, ou nem tanto, mas como é que a coisa funciona na prática? Vejamos a tradução de Tongue para “Le pont Mirabeau”, de Apollinaire, um poema muito cultuado, que, com o passar dos anos, foi assassinado inúmeras vezes por todo o mundo, de Richard Wilbur a Donald Revell, passando pela banda The Pogues. Aí vão os seis primeiros versos do original francês:

Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine

Et nos amours

Faut-il qu’il m’en souvienne

La joie venait toujours après la peine

Vienne la nuit sonne l’heure

Les jours s’en vont je demeure

Wilbur tenta reproduzir a rima de “Seine,” “souvienne” e “peine” com esta monstruosidade capenga:

Under the Mirabeau Bridge there flows the Seine

Must I recall

Our loves recall how then

After each sorrow joy came back again

Let night come on bells end the day

The days go by me still I stay

“Recall”, “recall”, e o que diabos é “come on bells”? Onde estamos, num restaurante sulista?!2 Em comparação com Wilbur, no entanto, Revell toma liberdades ainda maiores. Como qualquer adolescente, ele confunde amor e amante. Quanto mais gatinhas, mais sentimentos profundos e vulgares. Alguém aí vai de Haight-Ashbury?3 E, no caso dele, a água não corre, desliza:

Under Mirabeau Bridge the river slips away

And lovers

Must I be reminded

Joy came always after pain

The night is a clock chiming

The days go by not I

Revell deveria era ter escrito “the river slid into first base”4 para americanizar ainda mais a coisa. Quanto à banda The Pogues, que Deus a abençoe, não vou discutir sua versão cantável. Mas chega de embromação, vamos ao que interessa. Eis, finalmente, a extraordinária tradução de Reggis Tongue:

Under the bridge Mirabeau runs the Seine

And our loves

It is necessary that it remembers me

The joy always came after the sorrow

Vienna the night sounds the hour

The days from go away I remain

A primeira coisa que se nota é que, ao contrário de Wilbur, Revell e todos os outros tradutores de língua inglesa – Meredith, Hartley, Padgett etc –, Tongue não angliciza “le pont Mirabeau”, transformando-a em “Mirabeau bridge”. Ao não inverter a ordem das palavras do francês, ele preserva a ambigüidade de “Mirabeau”, que é tanto uma ponte quanto uma mulher, a mulher enquanto ponte, uma imagem bela e obsedante e a pessoa a quem o narrador se dirige. No verso seguinte, “our loves” se transformam também nos amores dela – é por isso que Apollinaire escreve “nos amours”, e não “mes amours”. Como Mirabeau designa um “belo reflexo”, o narrador também se dirige a si mesmo, um possível suicida que vê o próprio semblante no deslizar de um rio turbulento.6 Mas, felizmente, ele não se atira, pois um misterioso sujeito indeterminado7 – Deus? Amor? Amantes? Mirabeau, mon amour? – não o deixa esquecer que “joy always came after sorrow”.8 O verbo no passado, “came”, preserva uma dúvida trágica e incerta, pois não sabemos, nunca saberemos, se a alegria um dia voltará. Nos dois versos seguintes, Tongue nos revela toda a genialidade de seu talento de tradutor. Ele não converte automaticamente “Vienne la nuit” em “Comes the night”, mas, reparando na inicial maiúscula de “Vienne”, entende que Apollinaire faz um trocadilho com “vienne” e “Vienne”, a capital com C maiúsculo do império austro-húngaro. Com esse discreto toque de mestre, o poeta evoca Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, de Mozart, composta em Viena, no ano de 1787. A recordação e a expectativa de uma pequena serenata, uma bimbadinha, a alegria que sempre veio depois da tristeza. Uma outra alusão musical surpreendente aviva o verso seguinte. Sendo o primeiro homem moderno, Apollinaire se esbalda na cultura popular: “The days from go away I remain” é uma paráfrase mal dissimulada da letra de Paul Simon, “You know the nearer your destination, the more you slip sliding away”.9 E não é que os rios deslizam mesmo? Minhas desculpas, portanto, a monsieur Donald Revell.

 
Tradução: Regina Alfarano e Maria do Carmo Zanini

 

Raw, windswept, capital, regulated

To legally work nude, you must be employed
By someone who possesses a nude permit.

Nude means being devoid of an opaque covering
Over the genitals, pubic hair, buttocks, perineum,
Anus or anal region of a person, or any portion
Of the female breast at or below the areola, or
Male genitals in a clearly turgid state, even
If completely and opaquely covered. Nude,

You shall not be within six feet of a patron.
You shall not intentionally touch him or her,
Or allow a patron to intentionally touch you,

Whether nude or not. Nude, you must not work
Between 2 and 6 AM. You shall not encourage
Or allow the fondling or even casual brushing
Of your genitals, pubic region, buttocks, anus
Or breasts, sex acts, normal or perverted,
Actual or simulated, including intercourse,
Oral copulation, or sodomy, masturbation,
Actual or simulated, or excretory functions.

 

Cru, levado pelo vento, capital, regulado

Para trabalhar legalmente nu, você deve estar empregado
Por alguém que tenha uma licença para nudez.
Nu quer dizer: sem sequer uma coberta opaca
Sobre a genitália, pêlos pubianos, nádegas, períneo,
Ânus ou região anal de uma pessoa, ou qualquer porção
Do seio em torno ou sobre a auréola, ou
Genitália masculina num claro estado de turgidez, inclusive
Quando completa e opacamente coberta. Nu,

Você não pode ficar a menos de 2 metros de um cliente.
Você não pode tocar nenhum/nenhuma cliente
Nem vai deixar cliente nenhum tocar em você,

Estando nu/nua ou não. Nu, você não vai poder trabalhar
Entre as 2 e as 6 da manhã. Você não vai induzir
Ou aceitar carícias nem contato casual
De sua genitália, região púbica, nádegas, ânus
Ou seios, atos sexuais, normais ou perversos,
Reais ou simulados, incluindo penetração,
sexo oral ou sodomia – onanismo,
Real ou simulado, ou funções de excreto.

Tradução: Odile Cisneros

Sobre Linh Dinh

Linh Dinh nasceu em Saigon, Vietnã, em 1963. Emigrou para os Estados Unidos em 1975. Viveu também na Itália e na Inglaterra. É autor de dois livros de contos – Fake house (Nova York, Seven Stories, 2000) e Blood and soap (Nova York, Seven Stories, 2004) – e quatro livros de poemas – All around what empties out (Honolulu, Tinfish, 2003), American tatts (Tucson, Chax, 2005), Borderless bodies (San Diego, Factory School, 2006) e Jam alerts (Tucson, Chax, 2007). Seu trabalho foi incluído em The best American poetry 2000 (org. Rita Dove e David Lehman; Nova York, Scribner, 2000), The best American poetry 2004 (org. Lyn Hejinian e David Lehman; Nova York, Scribner, 2004), e Great American prose poems from Poe to the present (org. David Lehman; Nova York, Scribner, 2003), entre outras publicações. Linh Dinh também organizou as antologias Night, again: contemporary fiction from Vietnam (Nova York, Seven Stories, 1996) e Three Vietnamese poets (Honolulu, Tinfish, 2001), e traduziu o poeta Phan Nhin Hao para o inglês, em Night, fish and Charlie Parker (Dorset, Tupelo, 2006). Blood and soap foi escolhido como um dos melhores livros de 2004 pelo jornal nova-yorkino The Village Voice.